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Funded Research

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    • 2010
      Pump Priming

      Peripheral neuropathy and muscle weakness: how do they influence the safety of daily gait tasks for people with diabetes?

      Recipient:
      Dr Neil Reeves
      Institution:
      Manchester Metropolitan University
      City:
      Manchester
      Amount:
      £19,423.00
      Description: People with diabetes may not know exactly when their foot makes contact with the ground while walking because of the lack of sensation in their feet. This will mean that their muscles, which are alrea...
      Description: People with diabetes may not know exactly when their foot makes contact with the ground while walking because of the lack of sensation in their feet. This will mean that their muscles, which are already weakened, may not react quickly enough to adequately support the body. The major muscles of the leg in people with diabetes are weaker than those of individuals without diabetes, which may mean that people with diabetes are operating closer to their muscle’s maximum capacity when walking and performing everyday tasks. These factors are likely to increasing the chance of people with diabetes falling and injuring themselves. This project will identify problems that people with diabetes face when walking and performing other everyday tasks such as going up and down stairs. People will be assessed during these everyday activities in our laboratory by measuring the body’s movement and muscle responses as they walk. A special device monitoring eye movements will test whether people with diabetes look closer to their feet as they walk to compensate for the lack of sensation in their feet. This work will help us to understand the reasons why walking may become dangerous for people with diabetes and may lead to the development of strategies or interventions that help make everyday tasks safer for people with diabetes.
    • 2010
      Pump Priming

      Role of adipose tissue in age-dependent beneficial effects of PI 3-kinase pathway inactivation on glucose and lipid homeostasis

      Recipient:
      Dr Lazaros Foukas
      Institution:
      University College London
      City:
      London
      Amount:
      £19,662.00
      Description: Modern lifestyle and an increasing life expectancy have made the burden of age-related diseases, such as obesity and type-2 diabetes, a very significant problem of public health. There is an urgent ne...
      Description: Modern lifestyle and an increasing life expectancy have made the burden of age-related diseases, such as obesity and type-2 diabetes, a very significant problem of public health. There is an urgent need for development of medicines that prevent or treat these conditions.
    • 2010
      Pump Priming

      The regulation of metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in adipose inflammation and type 2 diabetes

      Recipient:
      Dr Jeremy Turner
      Institution:
      University of East Anglia
      City:
      Norwich
      Amount:
      £9628.00
      Description: Fat tissue in obese people is affected by a form of inflammation, and this is thought be important in the development of diabetes. A family of proteins known as metalloproteinases may contribute to ca...
      Description: Fat tissue in obese people is affected by a form of inflammation, and this is thought be important in the development of diabetes. A family of proteins known as metalloproteinases may contribute to causing diabetes, by controlling this inflammation and affecting how fat tissue changes in size when we gain weight. We want to expose fat cells from healthy non-diabetic people to conditions in the laboratory that mimic inflammation and diabetes, to see how the levels of these metalloproteinases change in response to this. Doing so will allow us to start understanding the function of these proteins, and help us to develop new diagnostic tests and new drugs for treating and preventing diabetes in the future.
    • 2009
      Pump Priming

      A role for C-peptide in alleviating diabetic nephropathy

      Recipient:
      Dr Paul Edward Squires
      Institution:
      University of Warwick
      City:
      Coventry
      Amount:
      £14,906
      Description: Kidney damage and reduced kidney function is a major complication of high glucose seen in diabetes. C-peptide is produced as a by-product of insulin production and has recently been shown to exert a n...
      Description: Kidney damage and reduced kidney function is a major complication of high glucose seen in diabetes. C-peptide is produced as a by-product of insulin production and has recently been shown to exert a number of protective effects when administered to diabetic patients presenting with renal complications. However, the mechanism by which C-peptide evokes this protective role in the kidney is unknown. This study will establish mechanisms by which C-peptide reverses structural and functional changes seen in the kidney, as a result of acute and chronically elevated levels of glucose, with the aim of identifying a novel therapeutic treatment.
    • 2009
      Sutherland-Earl Clinical Fellowship

      An investigation into the mechanisms of pathological bone resorption in acute Charcot osteoarthropathy

      Recipient:
      Dr Nina Petrova
      Institution:
      Diabetes Foot Clinic, King’s College Hospital, London
      City:
      London
      Amount:
      £168,827 (three years)
      Description: Some people with diabetes and nerve damage can develop a bone and joint disease known as the “Charcot foot” in which there is considerable bone destruction. This bone destruction is caused by special ...
      Description: Some people with diabetes and nerve damage can develop a bone and joint disease known as the “Charcot foot” in which there is considerable bone destruction. This bone destruction is caused by special cells called osteoclasts. We will investigate why osteoclasts from patients with Charcot foot destroy bone excessively. If we identify the factors that lead to increase activity of these cells, this will help the understanding of bone destruction and lead to new treatments for this difficult condition.

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